Hariri in France, vows to return to Lebanon by Wednesday

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4phqxlZGPk

Lebanon's Prime Minister Saad Hariri has confirmed he'll return to Beirut to celebrate Lebanon's Independence Day by Wednesday – and will hold talks with President Michel Aoun. Hariri made the statement during his visit to France with his wife and eldest son. Two of his other children remained in Saudi Arabia. Al Jazeera's Natacha Butler reports from Paris. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
– Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish
– Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera
– Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

Zimbabwe crisis: Tens of thousands demand ‘Mugabe must go’

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yqImEOw9j1Y

Tens of thousands of people have joined rallies across Zimbabwe's capital Harare, calling for President Robert Mugabe to resign. The 93-year-old has been under house confinement since the military took control on Wednesday. His ruling Zanu-PF party says it will hold a meeting on Sunday to discuss Mugabe's fate. One of Africa's longest-serving leaders, Robert Mugabe, along with his wife Grace, was reported to have said they have no intention of stepping down. Al Jazeera's Haru Mutasa reports from Harare. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
– Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish
– Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera
– Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

Palestinians warn they will freeze US ties if PLO office closed

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0NmY8d8a0k

The US state department announced its decision to close the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) office late last week, citing a 2015 law placing conditions on the US mission office. It's hoped a meeting on Monday between the US Department of State and the PLO will shed light on the Trump administration's decision to close the PLO diplomatic office in Washington, DC. The planned closure of The PLO office in Washington prompted shock and a threat from a senior Palestinian official to freeze ties with the US. The move has strained relations between the US and Palestine at a time when the administration claims it is attempting to reinvigorate the Palestine-Israel peace process. Al Jazeera's Diane Eastabrook reports from Washington, DC. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
– Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish
– Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera
– Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

What is Mohammed Bin Salman’s next move?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4RYSw3tfGzw

There are reports that Saudi Arabia is demanding money from the senior officials it recently arrested. Saudi Arabia's 32-year-old Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman is stoking huge tension in an already volatile region. He has made a number of controversial decisions that many believe could forever change the Kingdom and the entire region. The developments in Saudi Arabia and what they mean for the rest of the world, have been the focus of a conference in London on Saturday. That's where former diplomats and Middle East Analysts have been meeting to discuss the crisis and Saudi Arabia's future. So, how far will Saudi Arabia's young crown prince go to achieve his goals? Presenter: Laura Kyle Guests: Pierre Conesa – Lecturer at the Paris Institute for Political Studies. Sami Hamdi – Editor-in-chief of The International Interest. Afshin Shahi – Senior lecturer in International Relations & Middle East Politics at the University of Bradford. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
– Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish
– Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera
– Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

Snow leopards increase in the wild

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGsbCuPOyV4

One of the world's rarest big cats has been downgraded on the international list of threatened species. The snow leopard is now classed as merely vulnerable, not endangered. But the animals are still very hard to find and the Snow Leopard Trust believes that downgrading the cat on the international list of threatened species was a premature move.
Their numbers are still in decline and being vulnerable still means threatened.
Al Jazeera’s Robin Forestier Walker reports from Sary-chat Ertash nature reserve. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
– Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish
– Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera
– Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

UN calls for an end to Yemen blockade

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02jrGsJe3ac

Aid has started to trickle into Yemen almost two weeks after the Saudi-led coalition closed land, air and sea borders.
Vital supplies are being allowed into ports in government-controlled areas. While the blockade was designed to choke the alleged flow of weapons to Houthi rebels from Iran, it has made life difficult for millions of Yemenis as it cut of basic needs and assistance.
But the United Nations says only a complete lifting of the blockade will stop what could be the worst famine in decades.
Although “liberal ports” have been opened, there is still no flow of aid to the airport in the capital Sanaa and the port of Hodeidah through which a bulk of all aid was delivered.
Al Jazeera’s Mereana Hond reports. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
– Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish
– Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera
– Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

Art and architecture marry in downtown New York

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5BRiVB6jE4

New York's financial district houses some of the city's most famous structures.
But a group of architects is injecting some artistic flare into a downtown square.
Al Jazeera’s Kristen Saloomey reports from New York. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
– Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish
– Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera
– Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

When algorithms discriminate: Robotics, AI and ethics – Talk to Al Jazeera

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iyG-A09bBt0

We live in an age of rapid technological advances where artificial intelligence (AI) is a reality, not a science fiction fantasy. Every day we rely on algorithms to communicate, do our banking online, book a holiday – even introduce us to potential partners. Driverless cars and robots may be the headline makers, but AI is being used for everything from diagnosing illnesses to helping police predict crime hot spots. As machines become more advanced, how does society keep pace when deciding the ethics and regulations governing technology? Al Jazeera talks to Stephen Roberts, professor of Machine Learning at the University of Oxford, United Kingdom, on the role machine learning plays in our lives today – and in the future. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
– Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish
– Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera
– Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

Venezuela in default: What next? – Counting the Cost

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gp_O6MSd8ZM

Oil-rich Venezuela has always paid its debts – even at the expense of its citizens. But this week, everything changed: Venezuela is now officially in default, which means it's officially bankrupt. Rating agency Standard & Poor's declared the nation in 'selective default' on Monday after it failed to make $200m in repayments for global bonds due in October. As more payments are due, Venezuela is facing what could be a messy financial unravelling. And that's not a good situation for its starving population as state assets may have to be sold off to pay credit holders. President Nicolas Maduro is acutely aware that he is running out of money, and he wants to restructure the billions owed to China, Russia and oil service providers.
Russia has already agreed to restructure $3bn worth of debt held by Moscow. But US sanctions mean that other credit holders can't even be in the same room as those negotiating the restructuring. And it's not clear what's going to happen next. "Where we go from here is anyone's guess," explains Edward Glossop, an emerging markets economist at Capital Economics in London. Venezuela's debt "restructure talks look doomed to fail and it's only a matter of time before the government and state-owned oil company outright defaults on its external debt." "One of the key hurdles for the restructuring is US financial sanctions which prevent US investors from participating in any restructuring or refinancing deal … and that's why we think the restructuring and refinancing is likely to fail in the current environment," says Glossop. Also on this episode of Counting the Cost: Zimbabwe's broken economy: Zimbabwe's army seized control of the country on Tuesday night, claiming it was removing "criminals" around Robert Mugabe, and held the president and his family under house arrest. But can the military intervention really bring change for the country's ailing economy? The price of Bitcoin jumped as much as 10 percent on Zimbabwe's Golix exchange on Wednesday after the country's army seized power. Zimbabweans, just like Venezuelans, are buying things they think might retain value. Alisa Strobel, a senior economist at IHS Markit from Cape Town, offers her take. Lebanon's economic squeeze: Caught in the middle of a bitter Saudi-Iran rivalry, worries are growing about the outlook for the Lebanese economy. Growth has slowed to just over two percent a year from an average of eight percent before the war in Syria. But regional rivalries between Saudi Arabia and Iran have raised fears of a Qatar-style blockade. The recent resignation of Prime Minister Saad Hariri in Riyadh under mysterious circumstances has not been resolved. Just before he quit, the government had managed to pass a budget after years of political stalemate. Sami Atallah, the director of the Lebanese Center For Policy Studies in Beirut assesses why this matters for the region. Digital pills: It's been called the world's first digital medicine, and analysts say it could open up a new frontier in the Internet of Things. The US Food and Drug Administration just approved a digital pill. Basically, it's a sensor the size of a grain of sand. Once swallowed, it will send data to a smartphone app when patients have taken their medication. Kristen Saloomey reports from New York. Lab meat: Research shows that the global meat industry produces more greenhouse gas emissions than all cars, planes, trains and ships combined. But scientists in the Netherlands say they are close to bringing laboratory-grown meat to the market. This could slice emissions and save energy, reports Fleur Launspach from Amsterdam. More from Counting the Cost on: YouTube – http://aje.io/countingthecostYT
Website – http://aljazeera.com/countingthecost/

Syria’s Ghouta suffers from severe lack of medical treatment

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drPJN7rCqQA

Doctors have given the Syrian government a list of 452 patients that need to be evacuated, but nine have already died while the UN waits for approval from the Syrian government. Around 400,000 Syrians living in the Damascus suburb of Ghouta have been besieged by government forces for the past four years. The UN estimates that only 10 percent of the necessary humanitarian aid is reaching the area that sided with opposition fighters and doctors have been forced to re-use medical tools intended for only a single use. Doctors there say many "100 percent" preventable deaths will occur if patients are not immediately evacuated. Al Jazeera’s Osama Bin Javaid reports from Gaziantep, near Turkey-Syria border. – Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe
– Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish
– Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera
– Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/